Showing 1 - 20 of 356 Results

  • Wed Feb 24 2016

    Stacked LL/RR canola off the menu for 2016

    The first canola hybrid to stack Genuity Roundup Ready and LibertyLink traits in one seed won’t be on the market for this growing season. Just weeks after its Jan. 22 announcement of a limited launch for InVigor Choice LR250 for the 2016 season, Bayer CropScience Canada now says concerns over seed quality and export market access have led it to push the launch back to an as-yet undecided date. “Through our regular seed monitoring measures we have discovered that the quality of the new hybrid seed is not meeting our high-quality standards,” Bayer’s manager for oilseed crop traits, Jame...

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  • Tue Feb 23 2016

    New potato protection products for 2016

    Forum BASF’s Forum was expected to be registered in January 2016, says Scott Hodgins, manager for BASF Canada in Mississauga, Ont. Forum is composed of an active ingredient already used in the fungicide Zampro SC — dimethomorph, from the chemical Group 45. Forum’s mode of action makes it a highly systemic fungicide for the control of late blight in potato and other vegetable crops. Its antisporulating activity kills Phytophthora infestans, the spores of the late blight fungus, and protects the crop right at the beginning of infection. Forum will be offered in an easy-to-use liquid formul...

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  • Tue Feb 23 2016

    Time of day can impact spray: PPO herbicides more effective when sprayed at midday

    The study evaluated three protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) herbicides applied to glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth in soybean plots at sunrise, noon and sunset. After 14 days, the noon applications on average performed 15-20 percent better than the sunrise applications. The noon applications outperformed the sunset applications by an average of approximately 10 percent. "We're definitely getting better control when these herbicides are applied in the middle part of the day," says Garret Montgomery, lead author and doctoral student with UT's Department of Plant Sciences. PPO herbici...

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  • Sat Feb 20 2016

    After a false start in the 1970s, it looks like fababeans are back on the Prairies for good this time.

    Alberta farmers planted only 15,000 acres in 2012, but most estimates put acreage at well over 100,000 acres last season. This interest has crossed the border into Saskatchewan too, with more than 15,000 acres going into the ground in 2015, according to industry watchers, although they concede that when acreage is this low, relatively speaking, getting a good handle on the numbers can be a challenge. But the bottom line is that the crop is growing in importance quite quickly, and the dean of Prairie pulse crop breeders says there’s plenty of potential for more. Bert Vandenberg has bee...

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  • Fri Feb 19 2016

    A race against evolving blackleg

    Blackleg is not going away. In fact, AAFC researcher Dr. Garry Peng told Saskatchewan farmers at a November meeting, “we are seeing a creeping up of the disease over the last five, six years, in all provinces.” Researchers first began to recognize blackleg in canola in the mid-70s. Blackleg incidence reached a peak in the late 80s and early 90s. Then, with changes in canola management practices and the development of blackleg resistant seed varieties in the early 90s, the degree of incidence of blackleg fell. In the future, however, we may be seeing it more often. Peng is part of a gr...

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  • Fri Feb 19 2016

    Lower yields discourage sunflower acres

    Acres are expected to be ‘down just a touch’ in Manitoba this year, despite strong prices for the oilseed Canadian sunflower acres will likely be down or flat this year. Prices are strong, but yields dipped last year in Manitoba, and producers are choosing to grow easier crops such as soybeans. “I think acres will be down just a touch,” said Troy Turner, an agronomist with the National Sunflower Association of Canada, following the group’s 25-minute annual meeting in Winnipeg Feb. 10. Thirty-five to 40 people attended the meeting, demonstrating the decline in the number of sunfl...

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  • Thu Feb 18 2016

    All that confusion on seed treatments

    As the calendar has turned to a new year, the news from seed and chemical companies is that there is considerable confusion about seed-applied treatments. Growers, they’re finding, have been left with a mixed bag of information about the options available to them, much of which is flat out wrong. Some growers believed they had no seed-applied options at all, while others were confused about the levels of neonicotinoid seed treatments they could use. Some thought they could use 50 per cent, while others thought neonics had been banned altogether. It turns out the facts are a little ...

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  • Thu Feb 18 2016

    BASF adds two new AgCelence® products in 2016

    LANCE® AG and INSURE® PULSE seed treatment are the newest products in fungicide line-up "BASF is adding new and innovative fungicide products to its AgCelence® portfolio in time for next growing season to help ensure growers receive the best quality yields from their crops," said Jason Leitch, Brand Manager, Fungicides with BASF Canada. "BASF is committed to continuous investment in research aimed to help growers get the most out of their fields through proper protection against disease and other stresses." INSURE® PULSE seed treatment and LANCE® AG fungicide are the latest addit...

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  • Wed Feb 17 2016

    Two modes are better than one

    Farmers across the Prairies are looking at high pulse prices and trying to find ways to add pulses to their 2016 rotation. Crop protection companies are ready to help, releasing new fungicides to help farmers protect their yield from diseases like ascochyta blight and anthracnose. As with herbicides, to extend the life of fungicides and slow the development of disease resistance, provincial crop protection guides recommend that farmers rotate fungicides, using products from different Groups to control the same diseases, year after year. Fungicides are categorized into groups based on the...

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  • Mon Feb 15 2016

    Weed of the Week: Canada thistle

    Creeping thistle, as it is known in some parts of Europe, is best known on the Prairies as the perennial Canada thistle. This unwelcome European immigrant makes its way through the fields of western Canada by seed and root. Thistle patches might start from a seed, but the colonies often form from root buds that spread up to five metres from the parent plant. Canada thistle can resist drought by sending down roots as deep as three metres in search of water and nutrients. Plants grow as high as 1.5 metres and sprout flowers that are often purple but can also be pink or white. T...

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  • Fri Feb 12 2016

    Re-evaluation leads to retirement for Amitrol herbicide

    Health concerns raised during the federal re-evaluation of Nufarm’s pre-seeding burndown herbicide Amitrol 240 have led the company to stop selling the product for nearly all uses in Canada, starting later this summer. The company said Wednesday it will retire Amitrol — a non-selective Group 11 liquid whose active ingredient, amitrole, has been on the market for over half a century — and replace it with newer chemicals for pre-seeding burndown. In a release, the company’s commercial managers said Nufarm has made “an independent decision” to stop making Amitrol and have it off the mark...

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  • Fri Feb 12 2016

    SDHI fungicide sensitivity shift detected in two UK septoria isolates

    A new mutation in UK septoria populations, that could have implications for SDHI efficacy, has been detected at a field site in southern England. The isolates, which carry the same mutation as detected in Ireland in 2015, were discovered as part of an AHDB Cereals & Oilseeds monitoring project led by Rothamsted Research. In 2015, wheat leaf samples were collected from 12 sites across the UK. From the samples, 1,168 septoria isolates were isolated and tested for fungicide sensitivity in the laboratory. One site in southern England yielded 144 isolates and two of these were classi...

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  • Wed Feb 10 2016

    No ‘silver bullets’ for fusarium — but you can reduce your risk

    When it comes to fusarium head blight, cereal growers tend to suffer from NIMBY syndrome — ‘not in my backyard.’ At best, producers can only hope to manage fusarium head blight, which can be found in almost every county in Alberta, said research scientist Kelly Turkington.photo: File “Over the years, we’ve heard many comments that ‘it’s a Manitoba problem — it’ll never be a problem here in Alberta,’” federal research scientist Kelly Turkington said at the recent Agronomy Update conference. “But in some areas, like southern Alberta, it’s already well established. Other areas, like c...

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  • Tue Feb 9 2016

    Five keys to successful oat production

    Oats is a small-acre crop that has tended to fall behind in terms of agronomy research. That’s changing as more oat varieties become available and new niche markets continue to develop and offer premiums to growers meeting their specifications. For anyone trying oats for the first time, or considering adding oats to their rotation, Grainews has rounded up the latest oat-related agronomy information. 1. Diseases in oats One of the most pressing issues for growers is disease resistance, in particular resistance to crown rust, which is especially prevalent in Manitoba and some areas of s...

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  • Tue Feb 9 2016

    Heading off Group 2-resistant weeds

    Many common crop rotations in Manitoba are selecting for Group 2 herbicide resistance, as well as pushing resistance to other herbicide groups, says a U.S. weed specialist. Jeff Stachler of Ohio State University’s Auglaize County Extension Office told the recent Manitoba Agronomists Conference that a good rotation, not just of crops, but also of herbicides with different modes of action, is the first defence against herbicide resistance. The list of weeds resistant to Group 2 herbicides is growing across Western Canada and there are now at least 12 weed species in Manitoba resistant t...

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  • Fri Feb 5 2016

    How Syngenta is positioning itself for the future

    Davor Pisk, COO, Syngenta has a one-on-one discussion with Farm Industry News about how 2016 is shaping up, and the future as part of ChemChina. Davor Pisk serves as Chief Operating Officer for Syngenta. Farm Industry News sat down with Pisk to discuss the North American market and how Syngenta is positioning itself moving into the 2016 planting season. The company was fresh off of announcing its 2015 results. Worldwide sales were $13.4 billion, up 1% at constant exchange rates. For the North American market, full year sales were $3.4 billion, down 5% from 2014, but buoyed by a fourth...

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  • Fri Feb 5 2016

    Stripe Rust Showing Up in Texas Wheat Fields

    Bill Spiegel I grew up in north-central Kansas, and am the Fourth Generation to maintain and manage our farm on which we grow wheat, soybeans and grain sorghum. I'm a 1993 graduate of Kansas State University in ag communications. I joined the Successful Farming/Agriculture.com team in 2014. Less than six weeks into the new year, and we're hearing reports of stripe rust in winter wheat in Texas. Clark Neely, small grains and oilseed specialist at Texas A&M Agrilife, says stripe rust has been found in eastern and central portions of that state. While the infestation is not yet severe, t...

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  • Thu Feb 4 2016

    Heading off Group 2-resistant weeds

    Many common crop rotations in Manitoba are selecting for Group 2 herbicide resistance, as well as pushing resistance to other herbicide groups, says a U.S. weed specialist. Jeff Stachler of Ohio State University’s Auglaize County Extension Office told the recent Manitoba Agronomists Conference that a good rotation, not just of crops, but also of herbicides with different modes of action, is the first defence against herbicide resistance. The list of weeds resistant to Group 2 herbicides is growing across Western Canada and there are now at least 12 weed species in Manitoba resistant t...

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  • Thu Feb 4 2016

    New in spring cereal crop varieties

    The world of spring cereals may never be the same in Eastern Canada, especially in the next few years. In the past 12 months, two new positions have been filled within the public breeding sector, with new breaders at the University of Guelph and at Agriculture and Agri-Food’s Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre (AAFC-ECORC) in Ottawa. Although both positions will focus on developing winter wheat varieties, they’ll be screening materials of their own, along with those from colleagues and other contacts. Coupled with this is the Grain Farmers of Ontario’s expansion to include oat...

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  • Sun Jan 31 2016

    Wheat Issues

    The Wall Street Journal noticed wheat rust this week, but there's a bit more to the story. Your friend Ug99 Iran in the cross fire The long-term threat In the world of wheat, there is a silent killer out there - and the markets don't seem to care. Stem rust has been around for ages. The Romans had a god named Robigus who was worshipped in order to protect the crop from stem rust. In 1954, 40% of the wheat crop in the U.S. and Canada was lost to wheat stem rust. Wheat rust is in the news again. In Uganda in 1999, a new and more virulent strain of wheat fungus was detecte...

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